Corruption

Presumed Guilty: DOJ Sinks to a New Low in its Treatment of Yvette Wang


by Kelly John Walker

“The allegations in the Indictment are merely accusations, and the defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.”

So reads a DOJ release from the Southern District of New York regarding the arrest of Guo Wengui and his associate, Yanping “Yvette” Wang.

But actions speak louder than words—and the prosecution of a case alleging whistleblower Guo Wengui (aka Miles Guo and Ho Wan Kwok) of orchestrating fraud against investors, is fraught with inconsistencies and unsubstantiated allegations. Not only that, prosecutors admitted to the courts that they are working with Communist China to bring down Guo, who is the CCP’s #1 enemy.

Investor “Victims” Stand with Guo Against ‘Weaponized’ DOJ, SEC

Thousands of people know that this case is yet another example of the weaponization of the DOJ on behalf of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), and they are making their voices heard.

On April 8, and April 9, 2023, over 500 people – all GTV investors – demonstrated in chilly Central Park and then again on a yacht by the Statue of Liberty, chanting “Free Miles Guo,” including several music and alternative media celebrities. Similar protests took place in countries including Great Britain, Germany, Japan and others; on April 9, Taiwanese media reported that Taiwan’s GTV investors strongly assert that Miles Guo did not defraud them and they are demanding the release of Guo.

To these protestors, millions of supporters, and to anyone who’s examined the court documents, it seems clear that the DOJ is holding Mr. Guo and his associate, Yvette Wang, without bail as retribution for exposing their corruption and CCP collusion with the CCP to members of Congress. Nearly all the investors claim that the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), not Guo, illegally took their money and has not returned it two years later.

Are they “burying” Guo and Wang in prison to hide their own guilt? It would seem so.

Mistreating Yvette Wang: Bartering with Bail

Let’s pull back the curtain and examine the DOJ’s misuse of the right to bail in an attempt to coerce Yvette Wang into “ratting out” Guo. Remember these prosecutors are doing all of this strongarming based on “mere accusations” of people “presumed innocent.” Why are they putting in so much effort into a run-of-the-mill alleged financial fraud case?

See also  700 Chinese Migrants Apprehended at California Border in One Week

Arrested on the same day as Mr. Guo, March 15, Yvette Wang was arraigned separately and initially offered bail of $5 million, including the chance to have co-signers with “moral suasion.” In response, Wang’s legal team assembled eight co-signers who then put up four times the bail amount. The prosecution rejected all eight, claiming they are “victims” of the alleged fraud. Yet, why would “victims” put their own funds on the line to assure bail for a so-called “perpetrator?” It makes no sense, and the prosecutors have found no credible investor claiming they were victimized by anyone other than the SEC, a division of the DOJ.

That’s very fishy but, “hold the DOJ’s beer,” it gets worse.

Wang’s lawyer requested a bond hearing, claiming the prosecution had no valid reason to keep her in jail. Due to that legal foundation of presumed innocence, bail is almost never denied, especially in non-violent cases—take the release of Pras Michel and Sam Bankman-Fried on bail for similar charges, for instance.

The hearing was granted and went before a new judge, Hon. Robert W. Lehrburger.

“Future allegations”: Looking for a Crime

At the heart of the prosecution’s justification for denying bail was an allegation that Wang lied after being asked, “do you have any cash on you.” They accuse her, in other words, of hiding assets. However, they reportedly do not allege that she stole anything.

According to an eyewitness at the hearing, Judge Lehrburger repeatedly addressed the prosecution, saying, “you’re calling her [Wang] a liar, but what was the lie?” The prosecution reportedly responded that they didn’t know but they are “reserving the right” to make more allegations in the future.

See also  Controversies Involving Speaker Mike Johnson and His Sons Resurface — From Monitoring Each Other’s Porn Usage to Arrest of His Adopted Son on Charges of Running Illegal Cannabis Business

What?! Far from a presumption of innocence, this is a tactic the DOJ has been accused of in several recent cases: looking for a crime to fit the allegations.

Wang’s lawyer told the judge that the prosecution was keeping her in jail to coerce her into “squealing” on Mr. Guo, which is immoral. He also denied she is a flight risk, pointing out that her passport is expired.

The judge expressed concern by pointing out that bail is not intended for the government to make money, but rather to uphold the principles of justice [such as presumption of innocence]. He ended the two-hour hearing by ordering the prosecution and the defense to submit more information.

“The Court has some follow-up questions to the bail hearing held on April 4, 2023,” reads the Order. The judge essentially wants the following:

  • Date verification to determine whether the FBI asked Wang about her assets the day of the arrest—in which case she was under no obligation to answer—and the date(s) of any interview of the defendant by Pretrial Services, or the Government, that occurred after the March 15, 2023 hearing in which Judge Parker set conditions for Defendant’s release
  • What, exactly, the defendant was asked to disclose
  • For the prosecution to produce four documents substantiating specific accusations
  • Proof of accounts and assets

Confidence in the DOJ is at a new low, but the good news is that we yet have some judges committed to the Rule of Law and the principles of Justice this country was founded upon, including the presumption of innocence. They should be praised for their commitment to that Oath. And, considering the DOJ’s shameful and transparent use of lawfare against freedom-loving people on behalf of the CCP, Mr. Guo and Yvette Wang should be granted reasonable bail and released immediately.

About the author: Kelly John Walker is an American statesman, writer, branding professional, and entrepreneur. He is the founder of FreedomTalk, host of FreedomTalk TV, and a freelance writer.

Continue Reading
You may also like...
Comments

More in Corruption

Subscribe to our newsletter!

Awesome Deals On MyPillow.com Products https://MyPillow.com/FTR (Promo code "FTR")

Download My Podcasts Below

Eric Thompson Show Podcast