2024 Election

Elite University ‘Sex Week’ Events Include ‘Anal 101,’ ‘Strap-On Workshop’


Harvard University is holding a “Sex Week” that includes lessons like “Anal 101,” according to their event page.

The week is hosted by Sexual Education by Harvard College Students (SEHCS), which was founded in 2012, and is taking place between Oct. 30 to Nov. 5, according to their website. Other events during the week include “Caring for Your Coochie: Healthy Vulvovaginal Practices,” “I Can See Queerly Now: Demystifying LGBTQIA+ Intimacy” and “A Different Toy Story: Sex Toys 101.”

“Every year, we’re lucky to host workshops and presentations with educators from around the country.  The Sex Week ‘sex’perts do a fabulous job teaching our community about topics that range from ‘getting cliterate,’ to the philosophy of porn, to body positivity during intimacy, and so much more,” their website reads.

Experts from the Boston’s Children’s Hospital will be headlining the “Caring for Your Coochie: Healthy Vulvovaginal Practices,” according to Harvard Sex Week’s Instagram. The SEHCS also held a “Anal 101” event on “all things anal, from safety to pleasure” on Tuesday.

“Our workshops are lead by experts in the fields of sexual health and intimacy, who ensure that each individual in attendance leaves feeling knowledgeable and empowered.  We firmly believe that it’s just as important to get an education inside the bedroom as it is inside the classroom,” the website reads.

Multiple sexual product companies including Astroglide, Boy Butter, Condomania, EmojiBator Vibrators and BananaPants, are sponsoring the events, according to the event’s website.

Harvard’s Sexweek.org website states:

Our team at Sexual Education by Harvard College Students believe that everyone is entitled to consent, anytime and anywhere, in and outside the bedroom. We define consent as FAIR(S), which has been adapted from Planned Parenthood’s definition of consent:

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  • Freely given: Consenting is a choice you make without pressure (including power-based pressure), coercion, or manipulation. Are drugs or alcohol involved? Be really careful about whether consent is truly freely given. All parties should be grounded in reality when giving consent. Consent can not be freely given when impaired.

  • Authentic: No matter your why, consent comes from a genuine place, not out of obligation. Consenting is to stuff you WANT, not things that you feel you’re expected to.

  • Informed: You can only consent to something if you have the full story. For example, if someone says they’ll use a condom and then they don’t, there isn’t full consent.

  • Reversible: Anyone can change their mind about what they feel like doing, anytime. Even if you’ve done it before, and even if you’ve already said yes and are both naked in bed.

  • Specific: Saying yes to one thing doesn’t mean you’ve said yes to others. Going to the bedroom to make out doesn’t mean you’ve consented to having sex. Letting your roommate borrow your clothes doesn’t mean you’ve consented to them eating your food.

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Ella Ford is a mother of two, a Christian conservative writer with degrees in American History, Social and Behavioral Science and Liberal Studies, based in the Tulsa, Oklahoma area.

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